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Tracking of Arctic tern migrations 2007-2008 (aggregated per 1-degree cell)

Latest version published on Aug 4, 2017
This resource has not been registered with GBIF

Original provider: Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Dataset credits: Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Abstract: The study of long-distance migration provides insights into the habits and performance of organisms at the limit of their physical abilities. The Arctic tern <i>Sterna paradisaea</i> is the epitome of such behavior; despite its small size (<125 g), banding recoveries and at-sea surveys suggest that its annual migration from boreal and high Arctic breeding grounds to the Southern Ocean may be the longest seasonal movement of any animal. Our tracking of 11 Arctic terns fitted with miniature (1.4 g) geolocators revealed that these birds do indeed travel huge distances (more than 80,000 km annually for some individuals). As well as confirming the location of the main wintering region, we also identified a previously unknown oceanic stopover area in the North Atlantic used by birds from at least two breeding populations (from Greenland and Iceland). Although birds from the same colony took one of two alternative southbound migration routes following the African or South American coast, all returned on a broadly similar, sigmoidal trajectory, crossing from east to west in the Atlantic in the region of the equatorial Intertropical Convergence Zone. Arctic terns clearly target regions of high marine productivity both as stopover and wintering areas, and exploit prevailing global wind systems to reduce flight costs on long-distance commutes. Purpose: The Arctic tern is known to make the longest annual migration in the animal kingdom. During its breeding season, it is found far to the north where summer days are long, and it winters far south in the southern hemisphere, where the days are longest during November to February. This means that the Arctic tern probably experiences more sun light during a calendar year than any other creature on Earth. The long-distance travel of the Arctic tern is well-known both amongst researchers and in the broader public. Now, for the first time, technological advances allow us to follow the Arctic tern on its immense journey, practically from pole to pole. Supplemental information: Four erroneous points were removed from the original dataset: ARTE_410, 9/17/2007 noon; ARTE_370, 9/13/2007 noon; ARTE_373, 9/15/2007 noon and 9/16/2007 noon. Sand Island (74.263 degrees N, 20.160 degrees W), northeast Greenland, is the breeding colony for these Arctic terns and was placed on the map (red-orange square). Sand Island can be used as the beginning and end of all tracks, but since exact dates of the starting and ending of the migration were not available (high-Arctic zone = continuous day light during summer = poor positions when using geolocators), the tracklines for each animal were not mapped to and from the breeding colony. This dataset is a summarized representation of the telemetry locations aggregated per species per 1-degree cell.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 2,060 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 2,060 records in English (143 KB) - Update frequency: not planned
Metadata as an EML file download in English (12 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (12 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Egevang, C. 2012. Tracking of Arctic tern migrations 2007-2008. Data downloaded from OBIS-SEAMAP (http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset/705) on yyyy-mm-dd.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC-BY-NC) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has not been registered with GBIF

Keywords

Occurrence,long-distance migration,at-sea hotspot,global wind systems,geolocator,trans-equatorial migration; Observation

External data

The resource data is also available in other formats

OBIS-SEAMAP Dataset Pagehttp://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset/705 UTF-8 Interactive map
FGDC Metadatahttp://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset/705/xml UTF-8 XML

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Carsten Egevang
Primary contact
Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
http://www.arctictern.info

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Carsten Egevang
Primary contact
Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
http://www.arctictern.info

Who filled in the metadata:

OBIS-SEAMAP
Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Duke University A328 LSRC building 27708 Durham NC US
http://seamap.env.duke.edu

Who else was associated with the resource:

Distributor
OBIS-SEAMAP
Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Duke University A328 LSRC building 27708 Durham NC US
http://seamap.env.duke.edu
Owner
Carsten Egevang
Primary contact
Greenland Institute of Natural Resources
www.arctictern.info

Geographic Coverage

Greenland,high-Arctic,Antarctica,Weddell Sea

Bounding Coordinates South West [-76.84, -62.56], North East [75, 107.07]

Taxonomic Coverage

Scientific names are based on the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS).

Species  Sterna paradisaea (Arctic Tern)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2007-08-13 / 2008-05-31

Project Data

No Description available

Title Tracking of Arctic tern migrations 2007-2008 (aggregated per 1-degree cell)
Funding NA

The personnel involved in the project:

Owner
Carsten Egevang

Sampling Methods

NA

Study Extent NA

Method step description:

  1. NA

Collection Data

Collection Name zd_705
Collection Identifier zd_705
Parent Collection Identifier OBIS-SEAMAP

Additional Metadata

marine, harvested by iOBIS

Purpose The Arctic tern is known to make the longest annual migration in the animal kingdom. During its breeding season, it is found far to the north where summer days are long, and it winters far south in the southern hemisphere, where the days are longest during November to February. This means that the Arctic tern probably experiences more sun light during a calendar year than any other creature on Earth. The long-distance travel of the Arctic tern is well-known both amongst researchers and in the broader public. Now, for the first time, technological advances allow us to follow the Arctic tern on its immense journey, practically from pole to pole.
Alternative Identifiers http://ipt.env.duke.edu/resource?r=zd_705_1deg